Special Education Services
2018 Special Education Conference
Triangle filled with three puzzle pieces. One piece is orange, one is lime and one is blue

In light of the evolving COVID-19 situation, this year's Special Education Conference will be held virtually. Registering today will allow participants access to the same engaging content they've come to expect from this conference, while doing so from the safety and comfort of their home or office.


This year's special education conference will provide a keynote address on stress, trauma, and emotional dysfunction and its relative impact on learning. 

We're excited to share afternoon breakout opportunities to enrich your skills and connect with your students. 

 

Register for this year's Conference for $90!

Register Now!


Thursday, June 25, 2020

8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

ESC Region 12

2101 W. Loop 340

Waco, TX 76702

 

For additional conference information, contact Teresa Chavez:
tchavez@esc12.net

Keynote: Steven G. Feifer, D. Ed., NCSP, ABSNP  

Steven G. Feifer is an internationally renowned speaker and author in the field of learning disabilities, and has authored eight books on learning and emotional disorders in children.  He has more than 20 years of experience as a school psychologist, and is dually certified in school neuropsychology.  Dr. Feifer was voted the Maryland School Psychologist of the Year in 2008, and awarded the 2009 National School Psychologist of the Year.  He was the recipient of the 2018 Outstanding Contribution to the Education and Training of Psychologists award by the Maryland Psychological Association.   Dr. Feifer serves as a consultant to a variety of school districts, and is a popular presenter at state and national conferences.  He has authored three tests on diagnosing learning disabilities in children, all of which are published by PAR. 
Steven G Feifer Headshot
  • This is a 2-part workshop that will explore the neural underpinnings of stress, trauma, and emotional dysfunction in children and its relative impact upon learning.   Environmental deprivation, poverty, childhood abuse, witnessing violence, and parental neglect can impact both cognitive and social-emotional development in children.  The initial discussion will focus upon behavioral symptoms of trauma, key brain regions impacted by stress and trauma, and  core factors that build resiliency in children.   The second part of the workshop will discuss five steps that schools can take to become “trauma-informed”, in order to meet the diverse needs of all learners.  Targeted assessment strategies, specific classroom accommodations, and key coping strategies will be presented for at-risk students.   Schools can enhance emotional wellness through early prevention efforts, appropriate assessment and screening techniques, and an improved school climate to foster emotional growth for all children.  

    • Discuss the prevalence of trauma and stress for school aged children, as well as the various sources from which trauma can occur.
    • Explore key brain regions that are impacted when students experience trauma, and the subsequent effect on academic and social skills’ development.  
    • Review five essential steps toward the development of a “trauma informed” school.   
    • Review various trauma screening tools and specific assessment techniques in order to conduct a “trauma-informed” evaluation.  
    • Discuss specific classroom accommodations along with school-wide interventions, and key coping strategies to induce a more positive school climate for all students. 
       
     
  • In this 90-minute class on augmentative alternative communication (AAC), participants will learn about the basics of speech and language development and the role of AAC in this process. Additionally, the definition and importance of core and fringe vocabulary will be discussed and demonstrated. The class will conclude by reviewing the benefits of organizing vocabulary in such a way that motor plans for words, automaticity and speed can develop. This foundational class will set the stage for AAC intervention that focuses on language acquisition in addition to communication. 
  • In this 90-minute block on augmentative alternative communication (AAC), participants will learn about best practice strategies for the communication partner. This class will cover creating the right learning environment as well as creating communication opportunities. While taking a client-centered approach, participants will learn how to model, prompt and respond during AAC intervention. The class will conclude by reviewing some signs of success. Through demonstration, video and practice exercises, participants will learn about the fundamentals of AAC intervention.

  • Participants will learn basic classroom management strategies to promote optimal learning environments to foster independence and increase positive interactions and behaviors among students and teachers. Specific strategies to increase desired behaviors and decrease challenging behaviors will also be provided. Participants will also gain an understanding of instructional strategies that promote skill acquisition for individuals with developmental delays or severe learning disabilities. Material will be adapted for elementary school settings. 
  • Participants will learn basic classroom management strategies to promote optimal learning environments to foster independence and increase positive interactions and behaviors among students and teachers. Specific strategies to increase desired behaviors and decrease challenging behaviors will also be provided. Participants will also gain an understanding of instructional strategies that promote skill acquisition for individuals with developmental delays or severe learning disabilities. Material will be adapted for secondary settings (e.g. middle school and high school).

     

  • One of the most basic of human needs is to be understood. Lack of understanding and/or following “standard practices” based on a label can have negative effects. We must stop looking for people to tell us what “to do to” our children, and learn how to understand our children so we can discover what “to do for” them.
    This session is designed to help people think and problem solve differently by looking at the brain of a person with autism, rather than the label. There will be discussions and activities to broaden knowledge on the neurological factors that can affect learning and behavior throughout the early years in life.  
  • One of the most basic of human needs is to be understood. Lack of understanding and/or following “standard practices” based on a label can have negative effects. We must stop looking for people to tell us what “to do to” our children, and learn how to understand our children so we can discover what “to do for” them.
    This session is designed to help people think and problem solve differently by looking at the brain of a person with autism, rather than the label. There will be discussions and activities to broaden knowledge on the neurological factors that can affect learning and behavior throughout adolescence and adulthood.

Betty Carter, MA, CCC-SLP 

Betty earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Communication Disorders at the University of Houston in 2000 and her Master of Arts degree in Communication Disorders at the University of Houston in 2002. 

Betty began her career as a Speech Language Pathologist in the public school setting where she worked with a variety of students with speech, language, and cognitive impairments from preschool through high school.  In her most recent position, she served as a Speech Language Pathologist, clinical supervisor, and Dallas area Assistive Technology (AT) Program Manager with Therapy 2000, Inc., a pediatric home health agency in Texas.  Betty has specialized in evaluating and treating pediatric patients with augmentative communication needs, providing AAC training and support to families and therapists in the field as well as assisting other Speech Language Pathologists with the AAC evaluation and funding process.

Betty holds the Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech Language Pathology from the American Speech Language and Hearing Association (ASHA), a state license in Speech Language Pathology in the state of Texas, and is a member of the Texas Speech Language and Hearing Association (TSHA).

 

 

 


 

Kristen Padilla-Mainor, EdS, LSSP, NCSP, BCBA

 

Kristen Padilla-Mainor is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology Department and also serves as the Director of the Baylor Center for Developmental Disabilities (BCDD).  At the center, she supervises graduate students specializing in school psychology and applied behavior analysis that provide intervention and assessment services.  Ms. Padilla-Mainor serves as the parent and community liaison, coordinates programming efforts, and works with local agencies to provide trainings in working with children with autism spectrum disorder and behavioral difficulties. She is working to expand services, training, and research opportunities for students and faculty with other departments across the university and within the Central Texas community. She teaches graduate courses in ethics for behavior analysis, practicum in school psychology and applied behavior analysis, and teaching children with autism and developmental disabilities. Her primary scholarly interests are in the areas of behavioral assessment, behavior management, and autism spectrum disorder.

Ms. Padilla-Mainor is a Licensed Specialist in School Psychology (LSSP) and a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA).  She has several years of experience in working with children in classroom and clinic settings. Prior to working at Baylor University, Ms. Padilla-Mainor worked as an LSSP conducting intellectual, academic, and social-emotional assessments, counseling students, and providing behavior consultation. 

Ms. Padilla-Mainor has received several awards for her outstanding service to the field. In 2015, she was awarded the Early Career Spotlight Award from the National Association of School Psychologists, Outstanding School Psychologist from the Texas Association of School Psychologists, and Task Supervisor of the Year from the Diana Garland School of Social Work.

 

 


 

 

Layne Pethick

Layne Pethick is a Behavior and Autism Spectrum Disorders Consultant for Region 10 ESC. He is holds a PhD in Business/Organizational Leadership and has a Master’s degree in Special Education with concentration in Human Behavior, Emotional/Behavioral Disorders, and Autism Spectrum Disorder, along with degrees in Elementary Education, Early Childhood Education, and Reading.

Layne has experience as a general and special education teacher, school administrator, district trainer, program director, and in higher education as a professor of special education, assessment, early childhood and teacher education. He has had several articles published and presents at local, state, national, and international conferences. He has, and continues to work with various countries in the areas of education and special education to include Mexico (2009-2011), Hong Kong (2011), Canada (currently), Vietnam (currently), and across the United States (currently).